Features of innovative scientific project management

Authors:
I.O. Golysheva1, O.F. Gryshchenko1
1. Sumy State University (Sumy, Ukraine)
Section:
Innovative Management
Pages:
142 - 150
Language:
English
DOI:
10.21272/mmi.2017.2-13


Annotation

The aim of the article. Over the past few years the share of innovative scientific projects is growing. But the theoretical framework of project management cannot keep up with such an active development. Therefore, the need to adapt the existing provisions of project management to innovative scientific project features is an undeniable fact. For that reason the aim of the article is to cover key features of innovative scientific project management, namely, to describe push and pull strategies of innovative scientific project management, to form structural and logical scheme of project management process with the indication of the main information flows and to indicate the main structural elements of innovative scientific projects.

The results of the analysis. The approaches to strategic project management are analyzed in the article. Push and pull strategies are considered as a major strategies for innovative scientific projects management. Push and pull strategies describe two distinct points of view in strategic level. Authors developed the logic schemes of push and pull strategies in innovative scientific projects based on this analyses. It should be noted that a distinction between sponsor’s initiative and research team’s initiative is a key consideration of push and pull strategies.

Different approaches to project process stages are reviewed. Despite the fact that the majority of authors suggest similar set of stages, but still some differences can be found. An outcome of recent research and publications review is the formation of the following stages of innovative scientific projects management process: 1) initiating, 2) planning & executing; 3) monitoring & controlling; 4) closing.

Authors developed structural and logical scheme of project management process with the indication of the main information flows based on allocated push and pull strategies, and formed stages of innovative scientific projects management process. The place and the role of the main structural elements of innovative scientific projects (project team (manager, members), donors (sponsors, creditors), stakeholders, competitors, intermediaries, suppliers, community (external environment, public) and customers) were defined in this scheme. Also, the main information and indirect flows that arise between structural elements were specified.

The essence, roles, functions and duties of the main structural elements of innovative scientific projects are summarized in the article. Examples are given of what objects can perform a particular role in the project management process.

Conclusions and directions of further research. The article consolidates both theoretic basis of project management (approach to defining a term “project” and its key elements) and practical aspects of implementation and maintenance of projects in innovative scientific spheres. As for the pathways for further research, an analysis of experience of innovative scientific project implementation, allocation of success and failure factors, and formation of the risk reduction activities might be also performed.


Keywords
economic development; innovative scientific project; project life cycle; project management process; push strategy; pull strategy


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